My Abhinandan Educational And Welfare Society

New Year and Skill Development in India

Skill Development NGO

The New Year is a time of celebration, reflection, and resolution for many people around the world. It is also a time to look forward to the future and hope for positive changes and opportunities. One of the most important areas that needs attention and action in the coming year is skill development, especially in a country like India, which has a large and young population, a growing economy, and a diverse society. Skill development is the process of acquiring and enhancing the abilities and competencies of individuals for various economic and social purposes. It can help improve the productivity and employability of the workforce, reduce poverty and inequality, and promote social inclusion and empowerment. However, skill development in India faces many challenges and gaps, such as the low quality and accessibility of education and training, the mismatch between the skills of the workers and the needs of the employers, and the social and gender disparities in skill development. In this article, we will explore how we can hope for a new revolution in skill development in India in the coming year, and how My Abhinandan, a leading NGO, is contributing to this cause.

New Year: A Time of Celebration, Reflection, and Resolution

The New Year is a common and universal phenomenon, but it is also a diverse and cultural one. Different cultures and calendars have different ways of marking the beginning of a new year, and different traditions and practices of celebrating it. For example, the Gregorian calendar, which is widely used in the world today, marks the New Year on January 1, but other calendars, such as the Chinese, Islamic, Hindu, Jewish, and Persian calendars, have different dates and months for the New Year. Some of the common ways of celebrating the New Year across different cultures include fireworks, parties, special foods, making resolutions, and wishing for prosperity and happiness.

The New Year can also be a time of reflection on the past year, and a time of resolution for the new year. Reflection can help us evaluate our achievements and failures, our strengths and weaknesses, and our joys and sorrows in the previous year. It can also help us learn from our experiences and mistakes, and appreciate our blessings and opportunities. Resolution can help us set our goals and priorities, plan our actions and strategies, and commit to our values and principles for the new year. It can also help us improve ourselves and our lives, and make a positive difference in the world.

Skill Development in India: Challenges and Opportunities

India is a country with a population of over 1.3 billion people, of which about 65% are below the age of 35. This means that India has a large and young population, which can be a demographic dividend if skilled properly. However, according to the National Sample Survey Office (NSSO), only about 2.4% of the Indian workforce has formal vocational training, and about 8.9% has informal vocational training. This means that the majority of the Indian workforce lacks the skills and competencies required for the modern and dynamic economy. Moreover, according to the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER), only about 50% of the children in rural India can read a simple text or do basic arithmetic by the age of 14. This means that the quality and accessibility of education and training in India is low and inadequate.

Some of the challenges and gaps that hinder skill development in India are:

  • The low enrolment and completion rates of formal education, especially at the secondary and higher levels, due to various factors, such as poverty, lack of infrastructure, poor quality of teaching, and high dropout rates.
  • The mismatch between the skills of the workforce and the needs of the employers, due to the rapid changes in technology, globalization, and market demand, and the lack of alignment and coordination between the education and training providers and the industry and sectoral bodies.
  • The lack of access and quality of vocational and technical training, due to the limited availability and affordability of such programs, the low awareness and aspiration among the youth and their parents, and the low recognition and accreditation of such qualifications.
  • The social and gender disparities in skill development, due to the prevailing stereotypes and discrimination against certain groups, such as women, minorities, and persons with disabilities, and the lack of inclusive and equitable policies and practices to ensure their participation and representation in skill development.
  • The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the education and employment sectors, which has disrupted the learning and livelihoods of millions of people, and has increased the vulnerability and uncertainty of the future.

However, despite these challenges and gaps, there are also many opportunities and initiatives to promote and enhance skill development in India, such as:

  • The government initiatives and policies to promote skill development and entrepreneurship, such as the Skill India Mission, which aims to train 400 million people by 2022, the National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC), which is a public-private partnership to fund and facilitate skill development, and the Pradhan Mantri Kaushal Vikas Yojana (PMKVY), which is a flagship scheme to provide short-term skill training and certification to the youth.
  • The potential of digital and online platforms to provide flexible and affordable learning opportunities, especially in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has accelerated the adoption of e-learning and online education, and has opened up new avenues and possibilities for skill development.
  • The collaboration and partnership of various stakeholders, such as the industry, the civil society, and the international organizations, to support and supplement the efforts of the government and the education and training providers, and to bring in innovation, diversity, and quality in skill development.
Skill Development NGO in India

My Abhinandan: Leading Skill Development NGO in India

My Abhinandan is a non-governmental organization that works for the empowerment and welfare of women and children, especially the victims of acid attacks, through skill development and advocacy. Acid attacks are a form of violence that involves throwing acid or a corrosive substance on the face or body of a person, usually a woman, with the intention of causing harm, disfigurement, or death. According to the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB), there were 226 cases of acid attacks reported in India in 2019, but the actual number could be much higher, as many cases go unreported or underreported. The survivors of acid attacks face severe physical, psychological, social, and economic consequences, such as loss of vision, hearing, or speech, permanent scars and deformities, trauma and depression, isolation and stigma, and loss of income and livelihood.

My Abhinandan envisions a society where women and children are respected, valued, and empowered to live with dignity and freedom. My Abhinandan’s mission is to provide holistic support and rehabilitation to the survivors of acid attacks and other forms of violence, and to enable them to become self-reliant and confident through skill development and entrepreneurship. My Abhinandan’s objectives are to:

  • Provide medical, legal, psychological, and financial assistance to the acid attack survivors and their families, by arranging for surgeries, treatments, counseling, compensation, and justice.
  • Conduct skill development and vocational training programs for the acid attack survivors and other marginalized women and children, in areas such as beauty and wellness, fashion designing, handicrafts, computer literacy, and spoken English, by providing them with trainers, mentors, materials, and certificates.
  • Create awareness and advocacy campaigns to prevent and end violence against women and children, and to promote their rights and dignity, by organizing rallies, workshops, seminars, and media events, and by engaging with the government, the corporate sector, the media, and the public.
  • Mobilize resources and partnerships with various stakeholders, such as the government, the corporate sector, the media, and the public, to support the cause of acid attack survivors and skill development, by raising funds, donations, sponsorships, and volunteers.

Some of the examples and success stories of My Abhinandan’s contribution to skill development in India are:

  • How My Abhinandan has trained and employed over 500 acid attack survivors and other underprivileged women and children in various sectors, such as beauty parlors, fashion boutiques, handicraft shops, and online platforms, by providing them with marketable skills and income-generating opportunities.
  • How My Abhinandan has helped the acid attack survivors to overcome their trauma and stigma, and to regain their self-esteem and confidence, through counseling, mentoring, and peer support, by providing them with a safe and supportive environment and a network of friends and allies.
  • How My Abhinandan has influenced the policy and legal framework of the government to recognize and address the issue of acid attacks and to provide adequate compensation and protection to the victims, by lobbying, petitioning, and litigating, and by collaborating with the National Commission for Women, the Ministry of Women and Child Development, and the Supreme Court of India.
  • How My Abhinandan has raised awareness and sensitization among the society and the media about the plight and potential of the acid attack survivors and the importance of skill development in India, by showcasing their stories, achievements, and aspirations, and by challenging the stereotypes and prejudices against them.

Conclusion

Skill development is a crucial and urgent need for India, as it can help harness the demographic dividend, boost the economic growth, and improve the social welfare of the country. However, skill development NGO in India faces many challenges and gaps, such as the low quality and accessibility of education and training, the mismatch between the skills of the workers and the needs of the employers, and the social and gender disparities in skill development. Therefore, we need to hope for a new revolution in skill development in India in the coming year, and to support and join the efforts of My Abhinandan and other organizations that are working for women empowerment and skill development in India. My Abhinandan is a leading NGO that works for the empowerment and welfare of women and children, especially the victims of acid attacks, through skill development and advocacy. My Abhinandan has trained and employed over 500 acid attack survivors and other underprivileged women and children in various sectors, and has helped them to overcome their trauma and stigma, and to regain their self-esteem and confidence. My Abhinandan has also influenced the policy and legal framework of the government to recognize and address the issue of acid attacks, and has raised awareness and sensitization among the society and the media about the plight and potential of the acid attack survivors and the importance of skill development. As we celebrate the New Year, let us also resolve to support and join the efforts of My Abhinandan and other organizations that are working for women empowerment and skill development in India. Let us hope for a new revolution in skill development that will create a more inclusive, equitable, and prosperous society for all.

Processing

Donation for My Abhinandan

  •  *